Severine DesLions Makes Her Debut in U.S.A. at RosettaStone Fine Art Gallery

Severine DesLions is my newest discovery.  She has already exhibited in many places besides her native France including London, Bonn, Beirut, Dubai, and soon in South America.  Thus,  I am extremely excited about being the first gallery to expose her work in North America.  Born in France in 1972, she studied at the ‘Ecole des Beaux Arts of Tours from 1990 to 1992 and still lives and works in Tours.  Since graduating Ms. DesLions has accomplished a great deal.  With many exhibitions in many far-flung areas of the world, she has also drawn the attention of many art critics.  Magazine coverage on her work is vast but mostly in foreign languages.  At the bottom of this blog is a link to one written in English and I urge you to take the time to read it.  The following was put together by myself and some of her friends who tried to translate highlights from some of her other many articles.

She has always been a great fan of comic book characters so it is no surprise that she created her own super hero, “Speed Boy,”

who traverses all her canvases helping to point out all the things in the world that must change in order to get us back to our lost humanity.  Of course it is easy to see other influences in her work.  Basquiat, who Severine holds up as the undisputed master of Street Art, is a strong source of inspiration in her art as are her other idols:  Miro, de Kooning, Picasso and Karel Appel.  Her artistic DNA also finds it roots in ‘Art Brute,’ primitive art and in particular the Maasai tribal art.

Earlier this year ‘Femme Magazine’ wrote about her exhibit at ARTLAB describing her as a protean artist who invites us to address globalism, not in terms of commercial trade, but through a universal outlook on life that is not afraid to face the threats to mankind such as wars, earthquakes, and climate threats in a whimsical and yet frightening cartoonish style.  See: .http://www.deslions.fr/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/SEVERINE-DESLIONS-FEMME-MAGAZINE.pdfARTLAB.

In the above article the artist refers to Albert Camus who was a French Nobel Prize winning author, journalist, and philosopher whose views contributed to the rise of the philosophy known as ‘Absurbism.’  He wrote at length about the essence of humanity during its cycle of the absurd.  “Caligula, Sisyphus, you, and me lose our identity in pursuit of the fantasy of happiness.”  For example, because of his conceitful living, Sisyphus was sentenced to roll a huge bolder up a mountain each day just to see it roll back down again.  With her works Severine tries to express a desire to get the world back to basics and our core values, leaving the frenzy of the world in which we live where consumption, permanent nervousness and the constant striving to get ahead makes us lose our ability to connect with one another in a humane way.  The article goes on to explain her criticism of advertising:  “The logos scrolling across our screens reduce the success of physical possession, it is distressing.”

Face-to-face with her work, she hopes visitors to the exhibition will have the freedom to probe this issue in their own way in terms of their experiences bringing their own individual psyche to their interpretations.  Her portraits express the inability to slow down a runaway world, which stresses us out and dehumanizes us.  Severine uses various mediums and techniques to express these questions in a visual form that uses masking, glazing, scratching, oil and acrylic.  Her disenchanted vision is also expressed by a free line and acid tones on top of a palette of extreme primary colors.  It seems paradoxical to express sadness by bright, strong colors,  but this reveals the optimistic nature of the artist who hopes a move towards a better world, a world of hope where man leaves a positive and beneficial impression – a positive sum revolt.

“I love above all what we humans are made of, but explains that we should not limit ourselves.   We must fully release the positive sides of our natures.  As Diogenes, it is in broad daylight that we look for a Man; but unlike the Greek philosopher mired in cynicism, she hopes to find him and make him discover his deep and caring nature – a challenge!! “

PLEASE GO TO THIS LINK TO READ THE ONE ARTICLE (OUT OF MANY IN OTHER LANGUAGES) WRITTEN IN ENGLISH:  http://www.deslions.fr/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/curve-2KP.jpg